Tag Archives: Women’s history

New @the SCL, Part 1: genealogy, trans-racial adoption, and more!

Have you seen our latest display?

New books on display at the Stone Center Library

Featuring titles newly available here at the Stone Center Library, current highlights include topics such as religion, genealogy, education, women’s studies and more. We encourage you to come on by and check them out, and will be introducing these titles in a weekly three-part series, starting today with a variety of resources pertaining to family:

Coming up next week: new titles in education studies.

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New @the SCL: Women & Theater

Thanks to a recent donation from UNC-CH Department of Dramatic Art professor Kathy A. Perkins, the SCL now has several new titles on and by female playwrights. Check out:

Perkins, Kathy A. African Women Playwrights. Urbana: U of Illinois P, c2009.

Perkins, Kathy A. Black Female Playwrights : An Anthology of Plays Before 1950. Bloomington: Indiana UP, c1989.

Perkins, Kathy A. Black South African Women : An Anthology of Plays. Cape Town: U of Cape Town P, 1999.

Perkins, Kathy A., and Judith L. Stephens. Strange Fruit : Plays on Lynching by American Women. Bloomington: Indiana UP, c1998.

Perkins, Kathy A., and Roberta Uno. Contemporary Plays by Women of Color : An Anthology. London : Routledge, 1996.

Trying to find more titles on this topic? Here’s a hint: click on any of the links above, select the “Subjects” tab that appears in the catalog records, and several hyperlinked subjects will appear. Clicking on these subjects will lead you to any other books in the UNC catalog in that category.

So for example, Black South African Women : An Anthology of Plays is listed under the following subject headings:

Interested in reading more South African plays written in English? One option is South African drama (English), which leads to this list of titles. These results can be further refined using the check-boxes on the left-hand side of the screen, for everything from location to format to date of publication, and so forth.

Happy searching!

Women’s History Month Display Highlights

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you may have noticed our latest display, which features selections in honor of women’s history month, hand-picked by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier.

Here are some of the highlights:

Azaransky, Sarah. The Dream Is Freedom : Pauli Murray and American Democratic Faith. Oxford ;: Oxford UP, c2011.

Blair, Cynthia M. I’ve Got to Make My Livin’ : Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-century Chicago. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2010.

Haynes, Rosetta Renae. Radical Spiritual Motherhood : Autobiography and Empowerment in Nineteenth-century African American Women. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, c2011.

Johnson, M. Mikell. Heroines of African American Golf : The Past, the Present and the Future. [Bloomington, Ind.]: Trafford Pub., c2010.

Lau, Kimberly J. Body Language : Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple UP, 2011.

Musser, Judith. “Girl, Colored” and Other Stories : A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in the Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., c2011.

Nevergold, Barbara Seals., and Peggy Brooks-Bertram. Go, Tell Michelle : African American Women Write to the New First Lady. Albany, N.Y.: Excelsior Editions/State U of New York P, c2009.

Perkins-Valdez, Dolen. Wench : A Novel. New York: Amistad, c2010.

Shields, John C., and Eric D. Lamore. New Essays on Phillis Wheatley. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, c2011.

Winn, Maisha T. Girl Time : Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-prison Pipeline. New York: Teachers College P, c2011.

Like what you see? Come on by for these titles and more! The Stone Center Library is open 8am-8pm Monday-Thursday and Fridays 8am-5pm. The Library is on the third floor of the Stone Center on South Rd., near the Belltower.

SCL Picks for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here at the Library options abound for those of you interested in women’s studies from a variety of approaches. Perhaps you’ve read the extremely popular novel The Help, have seen the award-winning film, or both. Love it or hate it, this complex work has inspired spirited debate with regard to its portrayal of race relations. Along these lines, today we thought we would feature a couple of our holdings on motherhood and the domestic sphere in the American South. Check out:

Born southern : childbirth, motherhood, and social networks in the old South, by V. Lynn Kennedy (2010).

  • “Kennedy’s unique approach links the experiences of black and white women, examining how childbirth and motherhood created strong ties to family, community, and region for both. She also moves beyond a simple exploration of birth as a physiological event, examining the social and cultural circumstances surrounding it: family and community support networks, the beliefs and practices of local midwives, and the roles of men as fathers and professionals. . . Kennedy’s systematic and thoughtful study distinguishes southern approaches to childbirth and motherhood from northern ones, showing how slavery and rural living contributed to a particularly southern experience.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6283703)

Cooking in other women’s kitchens : domestic workers in the South, 1865-1960, by Rebecca Sharpless (2010).

  • “Through letters, autobiography, and oral history, this book evokes African American women’s voices from slavery to the open economy, examining their lives at work and at home. Sharpless looks beyond stereotypes to introduce the real women who left their own houses and families each morning to cook in other women’s kitchens.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6460585)

If this topic piques your interest, don’t forget we’re always happy to provide further recommendations and/or reference assistance – by phone, email, or chat (StoneCenterRef). And in case you missed it the first time, here’s our Women’s History Month Round-Up of previous SCL blog entries and online resources in women’s studies, including the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web.

Next up on the SCL blog: Have you come by the Library lately? Make sure you check out our latest display, featuring hand-picked selections by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier for Women’s History Month. Stay tuned!

Women’s History Month Round-Up

March marks the start of Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “Women’s Education – Women’s Empowerment.” Before going on  a brief blogging hiatus for Spring Break next week, we thought we’d jump-start the month with a round-up of online resources and pertinent posts from the SCL blog archives. 

For example… did you know our Stone Center Library Guide to the Web contains a wealth of sites related to women’s history, achievements, and issues  across a variety of disciplines? Check out some simple searches here, here, and here.  From science and technology to literature and the arts, we’ve got you covered! 

In addition to these general resources, we’ve periodically featured profiles of compelling women of historical and cultural significance. See, for example, our previous posts highlighting the following female figures: 

Looking for a broader perspective? More of a book person? You’re in luck! Over the last couple of years we’ve taken the time to put together lists of recommendations for Women’s History Month which you may consult at your leisure: here, here, here, and here

We hope these links provide some inspiration for whatever your research or reading needs may be, and hope that you will check in after the break for more from us as we continue to celebrate women’s history here at the Stone Center Library. Finally, best of luck to those of you winding your way through midterm exams and assignments – Spring Break is almost here! 

New @the SCL, Part 2: The Arts!

Welcome back, faithful readers! Yesterday we posted the first of three listings of new books currently on display here at the Stone Center Library. Today’s new titles cover a wide range of the arts, including dance, film, music, and visual arts.

The Devil Finds Work (James Baldwin)

Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present (Robin R. Means Coleman)

Black Social Dance in Television Advertising: An Analytical History (Carla Stalling Huntington)

Marion D. Cuyjet and Her Judimar School of Dance: Training Black Ballerinas in Black Philadelphia 1948-1971 (Melanye White Dixon; with a Foreword by Lynette Young Overby)

The Dance Claimed Me: a Biography of Pearl Primus (Peggy & Murray Schwartz)

The Life, Art, and Times of Joseph Delaney, 1904-1991 (Frederick C. Moffatt)  

A to Z of African Americans: African Americans in the Visual Arts (Steven Otfinoski)

Back in the Days: Remix (Photographs by Jamel Shabazz)

Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade (Maurie D. McInnis)

Intrigued by any of the above titles? Click on the links for a brief summary or come by the Library and peruse at your leisure!

Coming tomorrow: post three of three, featuring a bevy of hot topics such as religion, gender studies, and more… stay tuned!

SCL Picks for Valentine’s Day, or, 14 Books About Love

It’s all about love today!  In honor of Valentine’s Day, Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier has hand-picked a selection of books from the collection on the subject of LOVE. In no particular order, here are 14 books for February 14th: 

African love stories : an anthology (2006), edited by Ama Ata Aidoo

Bicycles : love poems (2009), by Nikki Giovanni

Courtship and love among the enslaved in North Carolina (c2007), by Rebecca  Fraser

Forbidden fruit : love stories from the Underground Railroad (2005), by Betty DeRamus

Haruko : love poems (c1994), by June Jordan

How three Black women writers combined spiritual and sensual love : rhetorically transcending the boundaries of language (Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, and Dionne Brand) (c2010), by Cherie Ann Turpin.

I hear a symphony : African Americans celebrate love (1994), edited by Paula L. Woods and Felix H. Liddell

It’s all love : black writers on soul mates, family, and friends (c2009)

Love & marriage in early African America (c2008), edited by Frances Smith Foster

Love in Africa (2009), edited by Jennifer Cole and Lynn M. Thomas

Love poems (c1997), by Nikki Giovanni

Salvation : Black people and love (2001), by bell hooks

The suitcase book of love poems (2008), edited by Martin De Mello & Muli Amaye

Wild women don’t wear no blues : Black women writers on love, men, and sex (c1993), edited and with an introduction by Marita Golden

All titles are available here at the SCL. Enjoy! :)

* Image by Stuart Miles