Tag Archives: Music

SCL Picks for International Jazz Day

In addition to being National Poetry Month, did you know that April is also Jazz Appreciation Month?

“April was selected by the National Museum of American History, the originator of the tribute, because so many seminal people were born this month. The list includes Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Tito Puente and Herbie Hancock.” (Source: The Washington Post)
 

In addition, today – April 30th – also marks the inaugural observation of International Jazz Day! Whether you’ve been celebrating all month, all year, or just for today, here’s a sampling of related books available here at the SCL:

For more online resources, keep in mind the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes an ample music section under the category of “Arts.” Enjoy!

New @the SCL, Part 2: The Arts!

Welcome back, faithful readers! Yesterday we posted the first of three listings of new books currently on display here at the Stone Center Library. Today’s new titles cover a wide range of the arts, including dance, film, music, and visual arts.

The Devil Finds Work (James Baldwin)

Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present (Robin R. Means Coleman)

Black Social Dance in Television Advertising: An Analytical History (Carla Stalling Huntington)

Marion D. Cuyjet and Her Judimar School of Dance: Training Black Ballerinas in Black Philadelphia 1948-1971 (Melanye White Dixon; with a Foreword by Lynette Young Overby)

The Dance Claimed Me: a Biography of Pearl Primus (Peggy & Murray Schwartz)

The Life, Art, and Times of Joseph Delaney, 1904-1991 (Frederick C. Moffatt)  

A to Z of African Americans: African Americans in the Visual Arts (Steven Otfinoski)

Back in the Days: Remix (Photographs by Jamel Shabazz)

Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade (Maurie D. McInnis)

Intrigued by any of the above titles? Click on the links for a brief summary or come by the Library and peruse at your leisure!

Coming tomorrow: post three of three, featuring a bevy of hot topics such as religion, gender studies, and more… stay tuned!

Cesária Évora: 08/27/1941-12/17/2011

Renown Cape Verdean singer Cesária Évora died this past weekend at age 70. Earning monikers such as “The Barefoot Diva”  and “The Queen of Morna,” Évora began performing at age 16. Releasing her first album in 1988, by 2003 she had earned a Grammy for her album Voz D’Amor.

An international star, Évora became famous for her distinctive contralto and soulful performances of songs of lament and longing. Indeed, “Évora was considered one of the world’s greatest exponents of Morna, a form of blues considered the national music of the Cape Verde islands, a former Portuguese colony which gained independence in 1975.” (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-16232543). For more on her life and legacy, see the following links for obituaries published in the New York Times, the BBC, and the Washington Post, among others. You may also hear a brief clip of Évora in performance here.

For those of you who are UNC affiliates, if you’re interested in a more extensive discussion of her career from a sociological perspective we encourage you to make use of the new Articles+ search tool to locate the following article: “Cesária Évora: ‘The Barefoot Diva’ and Other Stories.” (by Carla Martin, in Transition, No. 103, Cabo Verde (2010), pp. 82-97). Here at the SCL we also have Music is the weapon of the future : fifty years of African popular music (2002), which includes the chapter “From Kode di Dona to Cesaria Evora: Sodade in A Major: The Music of Cape Verde”  (p. 191).

African American History and Culture: publications from UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South

If you haven’t already seen it, we highly recommend perusing the current issue of Southern Cultures, which is put out by UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South, and features a couple of articles of special interest:

–   “Bobby Rush: “Blues Singer–Plus,” written by William R. Ferris, who is Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History, Senior Associate Director of the Center for the Study of the American South, and Adjunct Professor of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

–   “For the Records: How African American Consumers and Music Retailers Created Commercial Public Space in the 1960s and 1970s South,” written by Joshua Clark Davis, who is a UNC-CH PhD and currently a fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C, researching “the globalization of African American music and consumer culture.”

In addition, the Center has conveniently compiled an extensive two-part collection of their publications on African American History and Culture, spanning the last ten years. Be sure to check it out here: Part I & Part II.

SCL Picks: Dance! Dance! Dance!

Calling all dance enthusiasts! Take a look at a few of our latest titles on dance in the Caribbean:

Pictured above: Making Caribbean dance: continuity and creativity in island cultures (2010)  |  Carlos Acosta: the reluctant dancer (2010)  |  Dance Jamaica: renewal and continuity: the National Dance Theatre Company of Jamaica 1962-2008 (2009).

Looking for other types of resources? Don’t forget to check out the Dance section of our Guide to the Web!

Happy reading, and hope you all have a fabulous holiday weekend! :)

SCL Picks: Hip-Hop!

As Black Music Month comes to a close, we’d be remiss if we didn’t highlight just a few more of the Library’s holdings… check out some of our picks in hip-hop!

Pictured above: Stand and deliver: political activism, leadership, and hip hop culture; Icons of hip hop: an encyclopedia of the movement, music, and culture (Vols. 1 & 2); The black chord: visions of the groove: connections between Afro-beats, rhythm & blues, hip hop, and more; That’s the joint!: the hip-hop studies reader; And it don’t stop!: the best American hip-hop journalism of the last 25 years.

Looking for more? How about…

Happy reading! :)

New display at the Stone Center Library!

Come by the library and check out our newly updated display! Featuring recent acquisitions in literature, history, politics, women’s studies, and music. Selections include Young Mandela, Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchens, Terry McMillan’s Getting to Happy, and Jay-Z’s memoir, Decoded.