Funding Roundup – March 2015

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A number of great funding opportunities with rapidly approaching deadlines are listed below. We will update this blog post as we learn of other opportunities with March deadlines. Please let us know of any that aren’t listed here.

DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2015

Mellon Scholars Program at the Library Company of Philadelphia’s Program in African American History

Dissertation fellowship, with a stipend of $25,000, is tenable from September 1, 2015 through May 31, 2016. The award may be divided between two applicants, each of whom would receive $12,500 for the period September 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016 or January 15, 2016 to May 31, 2016. Applicants must be in the later stages of research or writing; application deadline March 1, 2015, with a decision to be made by April 15.

Short-term fellowships, for doctoral candidates and senior scholars, with a stipend of $2,500 for one month of research between June 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016; application deadline March 1, 2015, with a decision to be made by April 15.

DEADLINE: MARCH 4, 2015 (FOR UNC-CH STUDENTS)

The Gordon P. Golding Senior Honors Thesis Award

The Gordon P. Golding Fund provides financial support to promote undergraduate research on the African American experience from the early 17th through the late 19th centuries.  Research grants are available to help offset the cost of conducting a Senior Honors Thesis. The grants, up to $500, can cover the cost of equipment, supplies, software, publications, transportation, and other expenses.  Eligible projects include, but are not limited to, senior honors theses and research-based undergraduate courses.  Application deadline March 4, 2014.

Application linked here:  https://honorscarolina.unc.edu/files/2015/01/HTRG-Application-2015-Spring.doc

DEADLINE: MARCH 8, 2015

Black Metropolis Research Consortium’s Short-term Fellowship (Summer 2015)

The BMRC offers 1-month residential fellowships in the City of Chicago for its Summer Short-term Fellowship Program. Generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation since 2009, the Summer Short-term Fellowship Program has engaged scholars, artists, writers, and public historians from the United States and Europe to better formulate new historical narratives of Chicago’s past. The new, original research and art developed through this program is significant as it illuminates the national and international importance of Chicago’s African American community.  Application deadline March 8, 2015.

Application linked here:  http://bmrc.uchicago.edu/content/2015-application-procedures

DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2015 (FOR UNC-CH STUDENTS)

 

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Harvey Beech Scholarship

Named for the late Harvey Beech, the first African-American student to graduate from UNC, the awards have been given annually since 1989 to recognize community leadership and support of UNC and the Black Alumni Reunion. See previous Harvey Beech Recipients.

Application linked here: http://diversity.unc.edu/resources/new-students/awards/harveybeech/

IAAR Summer Graduate Student Research

The Institute of African American Research welcomes applications for its 2015 Summer Graduate Research Grant. Funds support research that concerns African Americans or the broader African diaspora. While the IAAR especially seeks to fund projects that focus on the well-being and security of black communities anywhere in the world, students working on projects on any topic concerning African Americans or the African diaspora may be apply. Grants will be awarded for up to $2500. Predoctoral and professional school graduate students in any discipline are eligible to apply. Students must be in good standing and have completed four semesters of graduate coursework toward a doctoral or masters degree at UNC-Chapel Hill. Research must be carried out between May-August 2015. Award recipients will be required to give a talk in the 2015-2016 IAAR Graduate Student Brown Bag Lecture Series. The deadline for submission is March 15, 2015.

 

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‘Racialized Spaces and Proper Places: Frantz Fanon, Decolonization, and the Rise of New Territorialities’

Alvaro Reyes Flyer

Professor Alvaro Reyes, Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and  current UNC-CH Institute for African American Research (IAAR) fellow, will be delivering a talk titled ‘Racialized Spaces and Proper Places: Frantz Fanon, Decolonization, and the Rise of New Territorialities’ on  February 19, 2015, at 1pm in the Hitchcock Room of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

More information about Professor Reyes’ work can be found here.

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IAAR Brown Bag – “Condom Distribution and Safe Sex Messaging Intervention Targeting Young Black Women”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute for African American Research (IAAR) continues their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures with a presentation by Diane Francis, UNC-CH School of Journalism and Mass Communication.  The talk will be held on February 9, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. Ms. Francis talk is titled “Condom Distribution and Safe Sex Messaging Intervention Targeting Young Black Women”.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

Additional information about Ms. Francis’ work can be found here: http://caribbeanhealth.org/

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Department of Sociology Colloquium – Karen Fields

Karen Fields Flyer

Karen E. Fields will be delivering a lecture on February 4, 2015, at 12:00pm in the Hitchcock Room of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

Dr. Fields is an independent scholar and the author of several articles and three published books: Revival and Rebellion in Colonial Central Africa; Lemon Swamp and Other Places: A Carolina Memoir (with Mamie Garvin Fields), and a translation of Emile Durkheim’s The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. She also has two book-length works in progress: Bordeaux’s Africa and Race Matters in the American Academy.

She holds degrees from Harvard University, Brandeis University, and the Sorbonne.

Fields’ talk will focus on the French cities of Bordeaux and Nantes and their role in the “triangular trade” of slaves, manufactured goods and colonial products illustrated below.

Image: “Locke and slavery” Oregon State University n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2015.

Selected relevant UNC Library resources:

The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on Economies, Societies, and Peoples in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. Ed. Stanley L. Engerman, et al. Durham: Duke University Press, 1992.

Bordeaux Au XVIIIe Siècle: Le Commerce Atlantique Et l’Esclavage. Ed. Christian Block, et al. Bordeaux: Le Festin, 2010.

Deveau, Jean-Michel. La Traite Rochelaise. Paris: Karthala, 1990.

Eltis, David, and David Richardson. “Productivity in the Transatlantic Slave Trade.Explorations in economic history 32.4 (1995): 465-84.

Fields, Karen E., Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life. Ed. Barbara Jeanne Fields and . London;New York: Verso, 2012.

Harms, Robert W., The Diligent: A Voyage through the Worlds of the Slave Trade. New York: Basic Books, 2002.

Lindsay, Lisa A. Captives as Commodities: The Transatlantic Slave Trade. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008.

Miller, Christopher L., The French Atlantic Triangle: Literature and Culture of the Slave Trade. Durham: Duke University Press, 2008.

Morgan, Kenneth. “Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade.” International history review XXX.4 (2008): 785-95.

Saugera, Éric. Bordeaux, Port Négrier: Chronologie, Économie, Idéologie, XVIIe-XIXe Siècles. Biarritz; Paris: J & D éditions; Karthala, 1995.

Stein, Robert Louis. The French Slave Trade in the Eighteenth Century: An Old Regime Business. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1979.

Walvin, James, author. Crossings: Africa, the Americas and the Atlantic Slave Trade. London: Reaktion Books, 2013.

These and other sources are available as a printable PDF.

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2015 UNC-CH African American History Month lecture – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

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Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad will deliver the 11th Annual African American History Month Lecture on February 17, 2015, in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium.

In addition to being the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Research and a sought-after speaker, Dr. Muhammad has published extensively, including his book The Condemnation of Blackness: race, crime, and the making of modern urban America, and several articles. Links to published articles, audio, and video interviews are included below.

ARTICLES
Muhammad, Khalil G. “White may be might, but it’s Not always Right.” The Washington Post Dec 09 2007. ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “”Negro Stranger in our Midst”: Origins of African American Criminality in the Urban North, 1900–1940.” Order No. 3117624 Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick, 2004. Ann Arbor: ProQuest. Web. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. “Where did all the White Criminals Go? Reconfiguring Race and Crime on the Road to Mass Incarceration.” Souls 13.1 (2011): 72-90. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.
Muhammad, Khalil G. “Playing the Violence Card.” New York Times Apr 06 2012, Late Edition (East Coast) ed. ProQuest. 14 Jan. 2015.

VIDEO INTERVIEWS
Tavis Smiley Interview: Incoming director of the city’s famed Schomburg Center
The Root Interview: The Schomburg’s Khalil Gibran Muhammad
New York Times: Historian Will Direct Schomburg Center in Harlem
Moyers and Company: Confronting the Contradictions of America’s Past Jun 29 2012 (Video

AUDIO INTERVIEWS
Lake Effect’s Mitch Teich interviews author Khalil Gibran Muhammad on his book “The Condemnation of Blackness.”

 

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IAAR Brown Bag – “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute for African American Research (IAAR) will be holding the first in their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures –  “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles” presented by Adam Bledsoe, UNC-CH Department of Geography – on January 12, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

 

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Holiday Hours Winter 2014

The Stone Center Library will be closed from Saturday, December 20, 2014 through Sunday, January 4, 2015.

We will reopen on Monday, January 5, at 8am.

Here’s wishing everyone a safe and restful holiday and sending congratulations to December graduates.

We look forward to seeing all of you in the New Year!

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